China Tea: 10 of the Best
Tea, that most elegant of restoratives. Forget coffee and its all caffeinated edginess; it is he who drinks tea that will truly find greatness. As the masterful Chinese writer, Lin Yutang said, “There is something in the nature of tea that leads us into a world of quiet contemplation of life.” And with that in mind, we here at the The World of Chinese bring you 10 of the best, classic teas:
[ Note: According to  fermentation-based qualification there are five types of tea: white, green, yellow, turquoise (oolong), red and black. In this list you will find them all.]
Ti Kuan Yin
(碧螺春 – tiě guān yīn)
Iron Goddess. Is perhaps the most famous of oolong teas.  Originating in the 19th century and harvested in North Fujian, the tea has a subtle floral bouquet and is widely known for its significant health benefits; it increases energy levels in the body; it is a  a great antioxidant, serving to boost the immune system, while fighting cancer and heart diseases;  it increases bone mineral density, providing stronger bones; and finally, it provides anti-fungal support, meaning it can re-balance the body after taking antibiotics. If the health benefits aren’t your thing, well, we think it tastes pretty damn fine. The tea should be steeped at a relatively high temperature of 185 – 205 F degrees for 3-5 minutes.
Read more…

China Tea: 10 of the Best

Tea, that most elegant of restoratives. Forget coffee and its all caffeinated edginess; it is he who drinks tea that will truly find greatness. As the masterful Chinese writer, Lin Yutang said, “There is something in the nature of tea that leads us into a world of quiet contemplation of life.” And with that in mind, we here at the The World of Chinese bring you 10 of the best, classic teas:

[ Note: According to  fermentation-based qualification there are five types of tea: white, green, yellow, turquoise (oolong), red and black. In this list you will find them all.]

Ti Kuan Yin

(碧螺春 – tiě guān yīn)

Iron Goddess. Is perhaps the most famous of oolong teas.  Originating in the 19th century and harvested in North Fujian, the tea has a subtle floral bouquet and is widely known for its significant health benefits; it increases energy levels in the body; it is a  a great antioxidant, serving to boost the immune system, while fighting cancer and heart diseases;  it increases bone mineral density, providing stronger bones; and finally, it provides anti-fungal support, meaning it can re-balance the body after taking antibiotics. If the health benefits aren’t your thing, well, we think it tastes pretty damn fine. The tea should be steeped at a relatively high temperature of 185 – 205 F degrees for 3-5 minutes.

Read more…

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  3. cha-rmingg reblogged this from such-a-tea-ze and added:
    A fun and informative article! Read at your leisure.
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    Check out this fascinating and informative article on the top Chinese teas, their history, benefits, and more.
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    I actually have some of the Guan Yin tea and it is amaaaaazing ^_^
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