Chinese officials cutting corners again
The Qinghe Forestry Bureau’s sports ground in Tonghe, northeastern China, was looking dirty and threadbare when local officials decided to spruce it up a bit. And so they did: artificial grass was laid on the pitch, and brand new comforts were incorporated in the stadium’s structure, as reported in the Telegraph.
“Everything is fine,” said a nearby resident to a reporter of provincial television programNewsnight, attempting to praise the new county stadium. “The only thing is the running lanes. They don’t seem to be up to standard…”
And they were not. The new athletics track running around the football pitch was built with right-angles instead of the more traditional curved turns, making it possibly the world’s first rectangular running track.
Continue reading here…

Chinese officials cutting corners again

The Qinghe Forestry Bureau’s sports ground in Tonghe, northeastern China, was looking dirty and threadbare when local officials decided to spruce it up a bit. And so they did: artificial grass was laid on the pitch, and brand new comforts were incorporated in the stadium’s structure, as reported in the Telegraph.

“Everything is fine,” said a nearby resident to a reporter of provincial television programNewsnight, attempting to praise the new county stadium. “The only thing is the running lanes. They don’t seem to be up to standard…”

And they were not. The new athletics track running around the football pitch was built with right-angles instead of the more traditional curved turns, making it possibly the world’s first rectangular running track.

Continue reading here…

A folkore of Chinese plants: the water fairy
Plants have stories to tell. Well, they don’t actually tell bed-time stories about their life and ancestry (now that would be silly), but humans attach an emotional and historical significance to the plants that we have taken the liberty and effort to name, appreciate, and use in myriad ways. And many of these stories are told in the delightful A Vegetable Lover’s Handbook. The book contains many inspiring literary references–since ancient times, the Chinese as well as poets elsewhere have sung about plants, whose verses such as:
“蒹葭苍苍,白露为霜。所谓伊人,在水一方” (The reeds and rushes are deeply green/And the white dew is turned into hoarfrost/The man of whom I think/Is somewhere about the water) from The Book of Odes, and “劝君多采撷,此物最相思” (I hope you will gather as many red beans as you can/These, above all, will help you think of me) from Red Beans Grow in Southern Country have moved numerous kindred souls.
The Vegetable Lover’s Handbook tells us about an array of flowers, such as the Lotus:
Continue reading here…


A folkore of Chinese plants: the water fairy

Plants have stories to tell. Well, they don’t actually tell bed-time stories about their life and ancestry (now that would be silly), but humans attach an emotional and historical significance to the plants that we have taken the liberty and effort to name, appreciate, and use in myriad ways. And many of these stories are told in the delightful A Vegetable Lover’s HandbookThe book contains many inspiring literary references–since ancient times, the Chinese as well as poets elsewhere have sung about plants, whose verses such as:

“蒹葭苍苍,白露为霜。所谓伊人,在水一方” (The reeds and rushes are deeply green/And the white dew is turned into hoarfrost/The man of whom I think/Is somewhere about the water) from The Book of Odes, and “劝君多采撷,此物最相思” (I hope you will gather as many red beans as you can/These, above all, will help you think of me) from Red Beans Grow in Southern Country have moved numerous kindred souls.

The Vegetable Lover’s Handbook tells us about an array of flowers, such as the Lotus:

Continue reading here…

World’s largest aquatic insect found in China
Here at The World of Chinese, we like bugs—from cricket combat to insect aeronautics. Our reasons are threefold: bugs are awesome, bugs are cool, and bugs are neat. Well, this week was a good week for creepy crawly enthusiasts with the discovery of the world’s largest aquatic insect found in Sichuan Province.
It’s is of the order Megaloptera, which is a good fact for you to know so that you can impress your friends if you see one—that is, after you are all done screaming, and screaming, and screaming.  It has a wingspan of 21 centimeters and has enormous, tusk-like mandibles. Not much is known about this order of insects, as Bec Crew from Scientific American explains:
Continue reading here…

World’s largest aquatic insect found in China

Here at The World of Chinese, we like bugs—from cricket combat to insect aeronautics. Our reasons are threefold: bugs are awesome, bugs are cool, and bugs are neat. Well, this week was a good week for creepy crawly enthusiasts with the discovery of the world’s largest aquatic insect found in Sichuan Province.

It’s is of the order Megaloptera, which is a good fact for you to know so that you can impress your friends if you see one—that is, after you are all done screaming, and screaming, and screaming.  It has a wingspan of 21 centimeters and has enormous, tusk-like mandibles. Not much is known about this order of insects, as Bec Crew from Scientific American explains:

Continue reading here…

The Chinese built the railroad in Turkey
Building a railroad is not supposed to be easy. But China has been doing it so much in recent years they are now able to offer their services to others in need, writes the New York Times. This week marked the opening of the high-speed Istanbul-Ankara line in Turkey, conveniently connecting the political capital to the cultural capital in that country.
It was built by, you guessed it, the China Railway Construction Corporation (CRCC), marking their first foray into foreign railway construction. The 330-mile trip can now be covered in three and a half hours, about half the time needed if one were to drive.
Continue reading here…

The Chinese built the railroad in Turkey

Building a railroad is not supposed to be easy. But China has been doing it so much in recent years they are now able to offer their services to others in need, writes the New York Times. This week marked the opening of the high-speed Istanbul-Ankara line in Turkey, conveniently connecting the political capital to the cultural capital in that country.

It was built by, you guessed it, the China Railway Construction Corporation (CRCC), marking their first foray into foreign railway construction. The 330-mile trip can now be covered in three and a half hours, about half the time needed if one were to drive.

Continue reading here…

The never ending story: China’s Food Scandals
Food, not so glorious food. Yet again, the Chinese headlines are plastered with the disgusting and repulsive, and the nation is mired in another food scandal. In China we have to live with it every time we slink down to the corner fast-food joint.
A food processor based in Shanghai has been selling meat past its expiration date–green meat, deathly meat, old meat–to all sorts of places that, for better or worse, are hugely popular. Yup, I’m looking at you McDonald’s and KFC, and I’m not lovin’ it. I’m guilty of patronizing these awful restaurants myself, though I’m all-too-aware that this food is not top quality, so, when I hear of a product getting a new “sell by” date slapped on it, my heart can’t help but sink a little bit further into itself.
Well, today I’d like to look into the annals of Chinese food scandals, and hope that maybe one day the food safety inspectors will do their jobs, clean up their acts, and let us eat our horrible grub in peace.
Continue reading here…

The never ending story: China’s Food Scandals

Food, not so glorious food. Yet again, the Chinese headlines are plastered with the disgusting and repulsive, and the nation is mired in another food scandal. In China we have to live with it every time we slink down to the corner fast-food joint.

A food processor based in Shanghai has been selling meat past its expiration date–green meat, deathly meat, old meat–to all sorts of places that, for better or worse, are hugely popular. Yup, I’m looking at you McDonald’s and KFC, and I’m not lovin’ it. I’m guilty of patronizing these awful restaurants myself, though I’m all-too-aware that this food is not top quality, so, when I hear of a product getting a new “sell by” date slapped on it, my heart can’t help but sink a little bit further into itself.

Well, today I’d like to look into the annals of Chinese food scandals, and hope that maybe one day the food safety inspectors will do their jobs, clean up their acts, and let us eat our horrible grub in peace.

Continue reading here…

China to rule on ‘Gay Conversion’
In what could be a landmark case for the nation, China will have its very first court case against a so-called “Gay Conversion” clinic on Thursday, according to a BBC report.
China only stopped treating homosexuality as a disorder as recently as 2001, but in such a deeply Confucian society with a strong emphasis on producing children, those in the LGBT community face immense difficulties being accepted in wider society.
Continue reading here…

China to rule on ‘Gay Conversion’

In what could be a landmark case for the nation, China will have its very first court case against a so-called “Gay Conversion” clinic on Thursday, according to a BBC report.

China only stopped treating homosexuality as a disorder as recently as 2001, but in such a deeply Confucian society with a strong emphasis on producing children, those in the LGBT community face immense difficulties being accepted in wider society.

Continue reading here…