Ancient Apartments
When Tang Xiangting, the founder of Lixin Cloth Factory, built these apartments in 1919 for his senior technicians, they were the talk of the town and envy of all. Located at the flourishing Lixin Road where the biggest textile factories of Wuxi bustled with activity, these two-floor wood and brick apartments could hold up to 270 families and were a symbol of modern, industrial life in the early Republic of China.
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Ancient Apartments

When Tang Xiangting, the founder of Lixin Cloth Factory, built these apartments in 1919 for his senior technicians, they were the talk of the town and envy of all. Located at the flourishing Lixin Road where the biggest textile factories of Wuxi bustled with activity, these two-floor wood and brick apartments could hold up to 270 families and were a symbol of modern, industrial life in the early Republic of China.

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China’s Online Drug Bazaar Part 2

Many of these online chemical stores, that promise you every drug under the sun, are simple scams of course, but many are not. You don’t even need to spend much money. On Gh-reagent. com, a seemingly legitimate chemical research company, The World of Chinese was able to order 250ml of GBL (gamma-Butyrolactone) delivered direct to the door within 72 hours for a mere 69 RMB. That’s enough to get a small army extremely high for a whole weekend. As a recreational drug, GBL is a sedative that acts in a manner similar to alcohol. It’s also a pro-drug for GHB, and converting one drug to the other is a straightforward process that can be done with the simple addition of water and another extremely common ingredient. GHB, occasionally street-named liquid ecstasy, is widely known as a date rape drug, but it’s popular among drug fiends for its cheap intense high. GBL’s legal status, however, is complicated by the fact that it is used as a common solvent in various everyday products, such as perfumes, cleaners, and glue. While  GHB is illegal in China, GBL (which converts to GHB in the body) is not. In the very narrowest of technical senses gh-reagent might not be doing anything wrong. But GBL is no joke, and users have to be ultra-careful with dosage. A 2ml dose will get you high, really high, but a 5ml dose can send you into a dangerous, deep coma-like sleep; more can potentially kill you—all this from a cheap, legal, under-regulated product.
Continue reading here…

China’s Online Drug Bazaar Part 2

Many of these online chemical stores, that promise you every drug under the sun, are simple scams of course, but many are not. You don’t even need to spend much money. On Gh-reagent. com, a seemingly legitimate chemical research company, The World of Chinese was able to order 250ml of GBL (gamma-Butyrolactone) delivered direct to the door within 72 hours for a mere 69 RMB. That’s enough to get a small army extremely high for a whole weekend. As a recreational drug, GBL is a sedative that acts in a manner similar to alcohol. It’s also a pro-drug for GHB, and converting one drug to the other is a straightforward process that can be done with the simple addition of water and another extremely common ingredient. GHB, occasionally street-named liquid ecstasy, is widely known as a date rape drug, but it’s popular among drug fiends for its cheap intense high. GBL’s legal status, however, is complicated by the fact that it is used as a common solvent in various everyday products, such as perfumes, cleaners, and glue. While  GHB is illegal in China, GBL (which converts to GHB in the body) is not. In the very narrowest of technical senses gh-reagent might not be doing anything wrong. But GBL is no joke, and users have to be ultra-careful with dosage. A 2ml dose will get you high, really high, but a 5ml dose can send you into a dangerous, deep coma-like sleep; more can potentially kill you—all this from a cheap, legal, under-regulated product.

Continue reading here…

Badass Heroines From Ancient China 
The world of ancient warfare was the epitome of the traditional concept of masculinity. The term warrior often brings to mind hulking men with swords, rather than Xena-like warrior princesses. However, throughout ancient and imperial Chinese history, several women challenged this deeply rooted patriarchal system and kicked-ass while doing so.  From prostitutes and slaves to princesses and nuns, these female military generals of China changed the course of history.
The military history of ancient and imperial China extends back several millennia, from the Pre-Warring States to the Qing Dynasty. In 1700 BCE, China began expanding its power along the Yellow River. In the following thousands upon thousands of years, wars, battles, skirmishes, and rebellions shaped China into its modern state. Only a handful of women are recorded as active participants in the blood and gore of the battles. Few women defied the traditional role of obedient housewife and caring mother. Yet, the role of woman cannot be overlooked in China’s military conquests. As early as the Shang Dynasty (1700 BCE-1027 BCE) women generals have been recorded taking up arms in defense of China.

One of the earliest records of female warriors comes from oracle bones found in a tomb. The bones told the forgotten story of a ruthless military general of the Shang Dynasty (1700 BCE- 1027 BCE).  The warrior was 妇好 (Fù Hǎo), queen consort of King Wu Ding, high priestess, and military leader. In the era of the Pre-Warring States, 妇好 defended the Shang in several battles. At the time of her death, she was the first female Chinese soldier to be buried with the highest military honors.
In the Spring and Autumn Era (770 BCE-221 BCE), 越女 (Yuènnǚ) marked a place for women in the tradition of swordsmanship. The King of the Yue state bestowed the title the Lady of Yue or the Lady of the Southern Forest, after witnessing 越女 prowess with a sword. She became teacher and mentor, sharing techniques that influenced Chinese martial arts for the coming centuries.
History waits hundreds of years before another female military general emerges. From the time of Lady Yue, until the next female military leader, China goes through eight different ruling eras: the Qin Dynasty to the Sui Dynasty. Around 618 BCE, the dynastic forcibly changes hangs once more. The emergence of the Tang Dynasty can be largely accredited to 平阳公主 (Píngyáng Gōngzhǔ). The daughter of 李淵 (Liyuān), soon to be 唐高祖 (Táng gāozǔ) or Emperor Tang, led the army that defeated the Sui Dynasty. Princess Tang formed the 娘子軍 (Niángzǐjūn) or Army of the Lady, gathering thousands of men to fight in the name of her father.



Continue reading here. 

Badass Heroines From Ancient China 

The world of ancient warfare was the epitome of the traditional concept of masculinity. The term warrior often brings to mind hulking men with swords, rather than Xena-like warrior princesses. However, throughout ancient and imperial Chinese history, several women challenged this deeply rooted patriarchal system and kicked-ass while doing so.  From prostitutes and slaves to princesses and nuns, these female military generals of China changed the course of history.

The military history of ancient and imperial China extends back several millennia, from the Pre-Warring States to the Qing Dynasty. In 1700 BCE, China began expanding its power along the Yellow River. In the following thousands upon thousands of years, wars, battles, skirmishes, and rebellions shaped China into its modern state. Only a handful of women are recorded as active participants in the blood and gore of the battles. Few women defied the traditional role of obedient housewife and caring mother. Yet, the role of woman cannot be overlooked in China’s military conquests. As early as the Shang Dynasty (1700 BCE-1027 BCE) women generals have been recorded taking up arms in defense of China.

China time line pic (1)

One of the earliest records of female warriors comes from oracle bones found in a tomb. The bones told the forgotten story of a ruthless military general of the Shang Dynasty (1700 BCE- 1027 BCE).  The warrior was 妇好 (Fù Hǎo), queen consort of King Wu Ding, high priestess, and military leader. In the era of the Pre-Warring States, 妇好 defended the Shang in several battles. At the time of her death, she was the first female Chinese soldier to be buried with the highest military honors.

In the Spring and Autumn Era (770 BCE-221 BCE), 越女 (Yuènnǚ) marked a place for women in the tradition of swordsmanship. The King of the Yue state bestowed the title the Lady of Yue or the Lady of the Southern Forest, after witnessing 越女 prowess with a sword. She became teacher and mentor, sharing techniques that influenced Chinese martial arts for the coming centuries.

History waits hundreds of years before another female military general emerges. From the time of Lady Yue, until the next female military leader, China goes through eight different ruling eras: the Qin Dynasty to the Sui Dynasty. Around 618 BCE, the dynastic forcibly changes hangs once more. The emergence of the Tang Dynasty can be largely accredited to 平阳公主 (Píngyáng Gōngzhǔ). The daughter of 李淵 (Liyuān), soon to be 唐高祖 (Táng gāozǔ) or Emperor Tang, led the army that defeated the Sui Dynasty. Princess Tang formed the 娘子軍 (Niángzǐjūn) or Army of the Lady, gathering thousands of men to fight in the name of her father.

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DOG THIEVES SAVAGELY BEATEN BY VILLAGERS
Two Chinese men were brutally beaten by villagers near Guilin city, after being caught stealing dogs for meat, reports The Daily Mail. The pair were caught stealing  pets to sell for meat in restaurants. A villager caught the men in the act as they were stealing his dog–shortly after the thieves were bloodily beaten by the villager and his neighbors. The pair were dragged out of their car, beaten with bricks and bats. The car was heavily damaged by rocks as well.
The thieves’ car contained three more dead, drugged dogs in the back of their trunk, which caused an even angrier and larger group of attackers, reports Jianxi Daily. Even though the two men were heavily injured, the Sanjiang villagers refused to give-up dog thieves to the police officers. Instead, they continued to parade through the streets and demanded a guarantee that they would get compensation for their dead animals. They demanded 50,000 RMB.
Continue reading here.

DOG THIEVES SAVAGELY BEATEN BY VILLAGERS

Two Chinese men were brutally beaten by villagers near Guilin city, after being caught stealing dogs for meat, reports The Daily MailThe pair were caught stealing  pets to sell for meat in restaurants. A villager caught the men in the act as they were stealing his dog–shortly after the thieves were bloodily beaten by the villager and his neighbors. The pair were dragged out of their car, beaten with bricks and bats. The car was heavily damaged by rocks as well.

The thieves’ car contained three more dead, drugged dogs in the back of their trunk, which caused an even angrier and larger group of attackers, reports Jianxi Daily. Even though the two men were heavily injured, the Sanjiang villagers refused to give-up dog thieves to the police officers. Instead, they continued to parade through the streets and demanded a guarantee that they would get compensation for their dead animals. They demanded 50,000 RMB.

Continue reading here.

Us and Them   
An engaging photography exhibition, focusing on the different perspectives (of both Chinese and foreigners) of how China is perceived is set to open tomorrow. Us-Them will showcase the work of 21 international and 21 Chinese photographers and opens Saturday April 19 in Beijing’s 798 art district. It’s a free exhibition that will run until May 19; opening starts at 3 pm with no invitation required.

The exhibition hopes to capture contemporary China from the different view points of both Chinese and foreigners. Many of the images are captured by pure chance ranging as much in style as the chaotic nature of Chinese society itself.

Continue reading here. 

Us and Them   

An engaging photography exhibition, focusing on the different perspectives (of both Chinese and foreigners) of how China is perceived is set to open tomorrow. Us-Them will showcase the work of 21 international and 21 Chinese photographers and opens Saturday April 19 in Beijing’s 798 art district. It’s a free exhibition that will run until May 19; opening starts at 3 pm with no invitation required.

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The exhibition hopes to capture contemporary China from the different view points of both Chinese and foreigners. Many of the images are captured by pure chance ranging as much in style as the chaotic nature of Chinese society itself.

Johanna Hoffmann - DD 4 - Shanghai - worshiping the golden archesContinue reading here. 

Students of Beijing Chinese Language and Culture College Visit CRI:

On April 15th students from Beijing Chinese Language and Culture College visited China Radio International and participated in the Chinese Corner event.



Beijing Chinese Language and Culture College is one of the top five schools for overseas Chinese. It is dedicated to the Chinese education of overseas Chinese.



Come and join us at Beijing Chinese Language and Culture College!

Average Chinese proficiency within a year: HSK level 4-6

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Location: Huilongguan Campus: No.69 Qibei Road, Changping District, Beijing